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The Royal Observatory, Greenwich

London, United Kingdom
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15 Mins Walk from National Maritime Museum to Royal Observatory, Greenwich. On the way, you can see Time Ball, General James Wolfe Statue, Greenwich Line for East & West, Tombmarker of Edmond Halley, 38-Inch Telescope Dome, Altazimuth Pavilion, and Peter Harrison Planetarium. The Royal Observatory, Greenwich (known as the Royal Greenwich Observatory or RGO when the working institution moved from Greenwich to Herstmonceux after World War II) is an observatory situated on a hill in Greenwich Park, overlooking the River Thames. It played a major role in the history of astronomy and navigation, and is best known as the location of the prime meridian. The observatory was commissioned in 1675 by King Charles II, with... Read More
15 Mins Walk from National Maritime Museum to Royal Observatory, Greenwich. On the way, you can see Time Ball, General James Wolfe Statue, Greenwich Line for East & West, Tombmarker of Edmond Halley, 38-Inch Telescope Dome, Altazimuth Pavilion, and Peter Harrison Planetarium. The Royal Observatory, Greenwich (known as the Royal Greenwich Observatory or RGO when the working institution moved from Greenwich to Herstmonceux after World War II) is an observatory situated on a hill in Greenwich Park, overlooking the River Thames. It played a major role in the history of astronomy and navigation, and is best known as the location of the prime meridian. The observatory was commissioned in 1675 by King Charles II, with the foundation stone being laid on 10 August. The site was chosen by Sir Christopher Wren. At that time the king also created the position of Astronomer Royal, to serve as the director of the observatory and to "apply himself with the most exact care and diligence to the rectifying of the tables of the motions of the heavens, and the places of the fixed stars, so as to find out the so much desired longitude of places for the perfecting of the art of navigation." He appointed John Flamsteed as the first Astronomer Royal. The building was completed in the summer of 1676. The building was often called "Flamsteed House", in reference to its first occupant. The scientific work of the observatory was relocated elsewhere in stages in the first half of the 20th century, and the Greenwich site is now maintained as a museum.
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