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World’s Weirdest Museums

November 27, 2013

Museums often bring you deep and essential knowledge, taking you through a journey in time… or the weirdest museums will ‘amuse’ you, to say the least.

British Lawnmower Museum

This museum’s homepage invites you to enter the “fascinating world” to have an “unique experience”. Specializing in vintage lawnmowers, antique garden machinery and supplying parts and manuscripts for conservation of machines all over the world. This museum will take you through the history of garden machinery and open your eyes to it. Who knows, maybe you will find a new lifelong hobby or passion here.

Paris Sewer Museum

Running strong since the 1800s, the tours and museum of the Paris sewers take you down to the dirt. Visitors can walk on raised walkways directly above the sewage itself. Although your nose will probably not like it, the tour is very interesting and shows you a lot about Parisian history. If you find yourself in Paris and the weather is too hot or rainy for any other attractions, the sewers tour might be the place for you.

Leila’s Hair Museum

Located in Independence, Missouri, this museum is devoted to hair art dating back to the 19th century. Before the introduction of photography, hair art was used a way to give something memorable to a loved one. Products made included necklaces, bracelets, rings, lockets, paintings and medallions embellished with strands of hair. Founder Leila Cohoon, retired cosmetologist teacher and friends with Ronald Reagan and Oliver North, has been collecting hair since 1949. The museum, opened in 1989, was created because she was running out of space for her hair art collection built up over the years. The museum consists of several rooms where the walls are covered in hair art. There are no less than 500 wreaths and 2,000 pieces of jewelry, and a brooch dated 1680. You will also find hair from George Washington, Abraham Lincoln and others.

Avanos Hair Museum

Still on the topic of hair, the Avanos Hair Museum is a pottery, a guest house and a cave all at once. Located in the small town of Avanos in Turkey, it was already a known pottery and ceramics site until a few years ago. Legend has it that a local potter was bidding farewell to a dear friend of his when he asked for something to remember her by. The friend replied by cutting off a piece of her hair and giving it to him as a reminder. The potter put it up in his shop, and would tell the story to customers and tourists passing through. Upon hearing it, other women who enjoyed the story started leaving a piece of their hair as well. The museum opened in 1979 when a selection was put up for display, and now has over 16,000 samples of hair, rightfully making it to the Guinness Book of World Records.

World Carrot Museum & Berlotte Carrot Fan Club & Museum

These two museums share their passion for carrots. The World Carrot Museum is a virtual museum dedicated to educate, inform and amuse visitors regarding objects relating to the carrot. Recipes, trivia, history, tips on growing, storing and cooking, games, information on different types of carrots and changes to the carrot over history (from white/purple to orange, for instance). It will also keep you updated on festivals and events around the world celebrating the carrot. It also gives details of all carrot collectors around the world, with a gigantic list of exhibits. Belgium’s Carrot Fun Club, however, has its own physical carrot museum. Much smaller than the World Carrot Museum, it is located in an electricity tower and is curated by the many members of the city’s Carrot Fan Club, who have carrot clocks and even statues in their gardens.

Kansas Barbed Wire Museum

La Crosse, in Kansas, calls itself the Barbed Wire Capital of the World. Living up to its title, the city hosts a museum which exposes over 2,000 forms of barbed wire and its history, how it played an important role in the settlement of the United States and forever changed the landscape of fields. The museum was established in 1970, and its building is now the headquarters of the Antique Barbed Wire Society, an international organization committed to collecting and preserving barbed wire, and the Larry Greer Research Center, which houses collections of publications related to barbed wire and a complete collection of patents.

Burnt Food Museum

A museum whose motto is ‘always leave the flame on low…and then take a long nap’ is sure enough to catch your attention. The title shows what it actually is, a burnt food museum located in Arlington, MA. The idea came to the owner and curator as she had left a small pot of Hot Apple Cider to heat up, got a phone call and eventually the cider was forgotten and it became the first exhibit and according to her the most impressive. They also encourage you to draw fan art, take photos of your own burnt things and who knows, maybe that ice cream you stuck in the microwave will be their next exhibit!

Museum of Broken Relationships

We’ve all had our hearts broken and instead of breaking the hand-made pot you were given by your ex, this museum encourages you to give it to them, tell them the ups and downs and what a rollercoaster your failed relationship was. The say that by talking you will feel better, and they always take new exhibits. The museum is located in Zagreb, Croatia.

Toilet seat art museum

Master plumber Barney Smith has been creating art on toilet seats for many years. Now with around 1,069 decorated seats, he has been running this museum in his garage since 1992. It all started when his garage and hobby showed up on TV – after that, he just added a guestbook and the museum was ready. The museum is located in San Antonio, Texas, and is open every day to the public.

Grūtas Park (Unofficially ‘Stalin’s World’)

It is surely one of the most bizarre experiences you’ll ever have, a lot of the post-Soviet countries either got rid of all the insane amounts of Lenin statues (let’s not forget little boy Lenin as well) and other leaders, kept them where they were or are slowly making their way to removing them. Instead, Lithuania came with a very unique decision: taking all of them, sticking them in a park and let you walk through the biggest amount Soviet propaganda you will ever see in your life. Afterwards you can eat like a true Pioneer, have youths dressed accordingly and be served something which resembles Soviet food.

Tell us in the comments what is your favorite weird museum, and plan your visit to it on Trekeffect!

-Mariya Tugayeva

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Maria Tugayeva
Mariya is a Marketing guru and writer, with a world experience from living and growing up in different countries. Her work quote is: "In a word: pleasure. It's like, my pleasure in other people's leisure." -Daniel "Spud" Murphy, Trainspotting